Top Stories  
 
LensOnNews, Opinion
LensOnElections

Read More...  
 
India in the age of bread and circus - Siddharth Singh, Mint
It is the age of powerlessness at the Centre. For all practical purposes, a lame duck Manmohan Singh is presiding over a system where chief ministers call the shots. Nearly a dozen chief ministers, led by Mamata Banerjee, may have just ensured the freezing of the National Counter Terrorism Centre (NCTC). And if any proof of the Union government’s weakness was required, the Prime Minister provided it himself. Read Full Article››
Looking beyond a tattered truce - Syed Ata Hasnain, Hindu
Incidents instigated by the Pakistan military along the frontlines in Jammu and Kashmir are as predictable as the seasons. It is never too difficult to ascertain when they will begin and end. This year too, they are panning out in a similar manner. Over the years, the public has always believed these to be outside its domain of interest and something for only the Army to handle. But some things are changing this. First, because of social media, there is more information in the air, though insufficient for informed opinion.
Read Full Article››
Narendra Modi has filled that huge vacuum created by UPA, of leadership - MJ Akbar, Sunday Guardian
Democracy has many loose ends. Among them is the understandable itch of media to predict the fate of a marathon after the first hundred steps. But even the sharpest critics of Prime Minister Narendra Modi will admit, possibly through gnashed teeth, that he has got off to a very brisk start. The Prime Minister has established the parameters for governance during his term. He has reset the economic and moral compass of the nation. He has begun to unblock the arteries of the economy, clogged...
Read Full Article››
Indian-ness that has gone missing in foreign shores - Francois Gautier, Pioneer
It is lunch time at the home of the Consul General of India in New York, Dnyaneshwar M Mulay. A young Hindu American arrives. Her name is Suchitra Vijayan and she teaches part-time in Columbia University, one of the most prestigious in the US, and plans to start there a course on South Asian Human Rights. She says that she is first going to travel to India to interview Kashmiri Muslims and Christian Nagas — obviously an anti-Indian agenda — while her Indian consular mentor smiles proudly.
Read Full Article››
The story of Marans: Sun King and his brother - Business Standard
In under three decades the Maran brothers have created one of the strongest media houses in the country. The man who led this journey is 50-year-old Kalanithi Maran, chairman and managing director of the Sun Group. His media conglomerate dominates the southern television market, with 33 channels in four languages that reach more than 95 million households. The Sun Group owns the largest chain of TV channels in India. The group’s other business interests include direct-to-home broadcasting, 45 FM radio...
Read Full Article››
Understanding postcolonial Muslim politics - Hilal Ahmed, Hindu
The term “Muslim politics” is used, discussed, analysed and even criticised in a number of ways. Popular demands such as the protection of Urdu or Muslim Personal Law, the programmes, policies and activities of Muslim organisations or pressure groups, sermons, speeches and statements of influential Muslim personalities and the Muslim voting pattern in elections are often studied as legitimate constituents of “Muslim politics” in postcolonial India.
Read Full Article››
Friends for the future - C Raja Mohan, Indian Express
When they catch up this weekend in Kyoto, the ancient capital of Japan, Prime Ministers Narendra Modi and Shinzo Abe will celebrate the deep civilisational links between the two nations before they unveil the contours of a more purposeful strategic partnership in Tokyo on Monday. That Modi and Abe have developed a personal rapport over the years is well known. Although he could not make Japan his first foreign destination as PM, Modi has kept the essence of his promise...
Read Full Article››
Friends for the future - C Raja Mohan, Indian Express
When they catch up this weekend in Kyoto, the ancient capital of Japan, Prime Ministers Narendra Modi and Shinzo Abe will celebrate the deep civilisational links between the two nations before they unveil the contours of a more purposeful strategic partnership in Tokyo on Monday. That Modi and Abe have developed a personal rapport over the years is well known. Although he could not make Japan his first foreign destination as PM, Modi has kept the essence of his promise that he would attach special significance to ties with Tokyo. His trip to Japan is his first bilateral diplomatic engagement outside the subcontinent.
Read Full Article››
ISIS' clear and present danger - Claude Smadja, Business Standard
The time is over when United States President Barack Obama thought he could afford to make a joke about the ISIS. The jihadists claiming to have established the Islamic State are now the worst security threat ever for the Western world - but not only for it - surpassing by far whatever Al-Qaeda represented at its peak, on 9/11 and after. The militants of the ISIS, the so-called Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, are so hardline, and are demonstrating such a blind cruelty and ruthlessness, that they by far supplant what remains of Al-Qaeda...
Read Full Article››
Fantasising about peace with Pakistan - G Parthasarathy, Business Line
Diplomatic engagement with a neighbour having territorial ambitions and an abiding desire to alter the balance of power has to be carefully planned and executed. Apart from realistically assessing the balance of military and economic power, one has also to carefully assess the neighbour’s internal political equations, and whether the political and army leadership have the inclination and the will to live at peace, without resorting to terrorism as an instrument of state policy.
Read Full Article››
The barefoot government - Bunker Roy, Indian Express
Since 1947, Indians have not spoken out so strongly and clearly for a completely new brand of people running government. Mercifully, there are no ministers educated abroad. Thankfully, none of them has been brainwashed at Harvard, Stanford, Cambridge, the World Bank or the IMF, subtly forcing expensive Western solutions on typically Indian problems at the cost of the poor. Look what the high-powered, foreign-returned degree-wallahs have reduced this country to.
Read Full Article››
Previous  1 2 3 4 5  Next
Home   |   About Us    |   Our Team   |   Contact Us   |   Privacy Policy   |  Terms Of Use   |   Sitemap   |   www.m.lensonnews.com
Copyright © 2011 lensonnews.com All rights reserved.